Atelier, Skye

Atelier, Skye 2016

The Atelier takes place in Trotternish, Waternish and Duirinish, Isle of Skye 9th-13th MAY 2016 with Atlas Arts http://atlasarts.org.uk

What is ‘Atelier, Skye’?
 
A charrette is an intensive participatory group that engages a common enquiry. Atelier, Skye is a three-day charrette wherein a group of artists, curators, academic researchers and members of Atlas Arts will work with a series of common research ‘objects’ located in the north of the Isle of Skye (Trotternish, Waternish and Duirinish). 
 
Working with the charrette curators, ATLAS Arts have identified a series of sites and objects that will facilitate and contrast different methods of visual and material enquiry. These objects range from artefacts in local museums, to areas of outstanding natural beauty. By engaging with ‘things’ in the custodianship of Atlas Arts, our charrette will enable us to map and improve conditions for cross-disciplinary collaboration, shifting the emphasis away from doing research towards the creation of research objects.
 
We aim to assist Atlas Arts in meeting their aims and obligations as the primary arts organisation for Skye and Lochalsh and thus to the local populace. We will enable this by enlisting Atlas Arts to collaborate directly with artists, arts professionals and academics in the creation of common research objects. The charrette will  transform participants’ understanding of what material research is, what it can be and of who/what might participate in it.  We also hope to use our visit to establish an open access online archive of the project, proxy distributed by Atlas Arts, that will ensure Atelier’s methods are available to artists, researchers and educators working with comparable community-based and site-sensitive organisations.
 
What is ‘Skye’?
 
For the purposes of this project, Skye functions as host environment for engaging a broader community of academics and non-academics in contemporary art and materialist research. It is both a slowly changing land mass and a more rapidly transforming series of agents, things and discourses. ‘Skye’ is a contingent object, one in an ongoing process of flow and growth. Following the material-turn, it is appropriate that we do not presuppose a singular thematic or disciplinary approach towards ‘Skye’. This is why participants will work only from  things hosted by the island, discovering a varied flow of entanglements over the duration of the charrette. Our initial meetings with Atlas Arts Director Emma Nicholson established our objects of enquiry, the journeys our research group will make around the island, the iterative structure of the charrette research process and the ways in which we will document this.
 
What is ‘Atlas Arts’?
 
Based in Portree, ATLAS Arts seeks to be a pioneering producer and commissioner of contemporary art that will create connections between artists and audiences, and respond to the unique qualities of this region, its landscapes, its culture and its people. http://atlasarts.org.uk

Atelier: Richard Sennett ‘The Craftsman’

 

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Atelier Present:

Richard Sennett The Craftsman

THIS EVENT HAS SOLD OUT

Richard Sennett

Atelier warmly welcome Professor Richard Sennett, who will be discussing his seminal work The Craftsman at The University of EdinburghIn this book, he shows how history has drawn fault-lines between craftsman and artist, maker and user, technique and expression, practice and theory, and that individuals’ pride in their work, as well as modern society in general, suffers from these historical divisions.

Sennett’s research has explored how individuals and groups make social and cultural sense of material facts – about the cities in which they live and about the labour they do. He focuses on how people can become competent interpreters of their own experience, despite the obstacles society may put in their way. His research entails ethnography, history, and social theory. As a social analyst, Professor Sennett continues the pragmatist tradition begun by William James and John Dewey.

Shift/Work: Groundcourse | Roy Ascott

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The Groundcourse is a two year foundation led by Roy Ascott at Ealing (1961-64), Ipswich School of Art (1964-67) and currently at Beijing DeTao Masters Academy in Shanghai.

Groundcourse is a seminal educational experiment that is a key influence on Shift/Work. Prof Ascott will discuss Groundcourse before running a short exercise from it. This is a unique opportunity to experience the legandary Groundcourse at first hand.

Schedule:

1. Discussion of full Groundcourse programme, the theory behind it, and plenty examples of student outputs, both way back in Ealing/Ipswich and currently at De Tao.

Then comes the practice:

2. Each individual student will design and construct a machine that can calibrate changes in one’s individual environment and in one’s behaviour, producing for each user a severely limited repertoire of actions.

3. Organisms are identified, each consisting of five “calibrated” students , recognising their mutual dependancy in enabling the organism’s ability to produce  thought and action.

4. Each organism then to design and build an environmentally-situated  performative game.

5. Presentation: enactment of each organism’s game.

6. Organisms discuss their critical reflection of the process.

Professor Roy Ascott, Ars Electronica Golden Nica award winner, works with cybernetics and telematics on cybernetic art, focusing on the impact of digital and telecommunications networks on consciousness. He is President of the Planetary Collegium, and DeTao Master of Technoetic Arts at the Beijing DeTao Masters Academy in Shanghai. He is the founding editor of the research journal Technoetic Arts, an honorary editor of Leonardo Journal, and author of such the books as Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology and Consciousness.

Prof Ascott’s full biography can be reviewed here:

https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/roy-ascott and here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Ascott

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Mr @taytoettayto in paleo-futurist potato-based performance for Megahammer @artschool_ @GIfestival Thurs 7 Apr 7-9pm glasgowinternational.org/events/marvin-
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„DER FACHIDIOT?” The Paratechnic in the Monotechnic

„DER FACHIDIOT?” : The Paratechnic in the Monotechnic
13:30 Provocation Paper for CHEAD, ‘Agents of Change: Art School & Universities’ http://chead.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/CHEAD-Annual-Conference-2016-programme.pdf

Wandergesellen
Wandergesellen: Alexander Kiefer (center) with his journeymen in his last travel section of Niederwinden

 

Since the early ’60s, increasingly integrated paratechnical curricula have been (begrudgingly) hosted by monotechnical art and design schools. I outline the key characteristics and limitations of the (modernist) monotechnical art and design curriculum and give some examples of different integrated paratechnical tactics and strategies. From this, I suggest that the paratechnic attempts to pursue the following qualities:

Diversification of methods and communities of practice

Externally-networked dissensus (Bill Reading’s ‘University of Dissensus’)

1:1 scale immediation (non-representational)

Ludic, adaptive flow

Paragogical cooperation and collegiality

An opportunity lies in admitting that the monoculture of art and design education – its internal ethics – still nurtures modernist assimilation and bias, and that, in preventing art and design from realising its educational potential, fachidiots place their own field at risk of redundancy. From this we may begin a productive transformation of the art school’s communities of practice (its variety of staff and students) and their relations with international communities of purpose.

Mask Project, St. Martins Sculpture DipAD Course 'A', June 1972
Mask Project, St. Martins Sculpture DipAD Course ‘A’, June 1972

This Must be the Place

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 09.43.04Lightning Talk for Gearing Up for Transitions Conference, 2016

This Must be the Place, slides by Neil Mulholland

GUp Bring and Brag – This Must be the Place, A4 synopsis

Building and Installing Dividing Walls, a manual by Tobias Sternberg

Summary:

MFA students (School of Art) programme their own orientation week as a ‘paragogy’ project. They visit art organisations and, crucially, build their own studio spaces. They quickly establish socio-economic networks that serve them well in their careers as artists, critics and curators, generating an adaptive, geopolitical resilience.

This Must be the Place was concerned with the vital educational role of ‘place-making’, with how contemporary art students develop resources for their practice through the processes of orientation and socialisation. The orientation project was innovative in bringing together art students with non-academic partners for the purpose of introducing all of us to postgraduate education. It allowed MFA students to transition into platforms that suited their practices and so develop a generative context for work from the first week of the programme.

By collectively constructing their studio spaces MFAs gained a invaluable practical lesson in how to establish a studio with limited resources and find a practical solution to the ‘fit’ of the studios. This relates to the perennial problem of ‘allocating’ studio space, something nominally done by staff rather than students. The allocation of spaces is normally conducted before staff have had a chance to ascertain our radically different requirements as artists. RELAY proposed that MFA2s should first collaborate with new students to design and build the common studio spaces in Week 1 as a key component of the orientation project. Collectively designing the the studio space also ensured that all students got exactly the space they required. Part of this aspect of the project involved the construction of the Green Room with common, shared tools and resources and a means of ensuring that the social bonds cemented in the first week remain common, shared tools and resources and a means of ensuring that the social bonds cemented in the first week remain intact.

ABOUT Gearing Up for Transitions Conference, 2016:

The 3rd Annual University of Edinburgh ‘Gearing Up’ event took place on Thursday 5th March 2015 at the John McIntyre Conference Centre, Pollock Halls. To reflect the current QAA (Quality Assurance Agency) Scotland Enhancement Theme of Student Transitions, the event had a broader focus than in previous years and in recognition of this was called ‘Gearing up for Transitions’. It was jointly organised by the Student Induction Team and Academic Services.

The 150 attendees included current students, University of Edinburgh and EUSA staff as well as external colleagues from Higher Education Institutions in Scotland and two staff from Lund University, Sweden.

The day included:

  • a student panel talking about their experience of transitions;
  • Keynote address ‘What Works? Facilitating an effective transition into and through higher education” by Professor Liz Thomas, Liz Thomas Associates;
  • student Art Exhibition ‘It’s a Jungle’ by the University of Edinburgh’s student-run Graphic Design agency “Jungle Studio” dealing with the fear and anticipation before leaving home, school or university;
  • posters and bring and brag stalls;
  • 18 break-out sessions featuring a wide variety of current practice looking at all aspects of transitions during the student journey.

Shift/Work Decisions, Decisions

Decisions, Decisions

This workshop will help you to comprehend how your decisions impact upon your peers (and vice versa). Working in a small group, you will collectively engage in a series of simple creative tasks. These tasks have been designed by a group of artists specifically to heighten your awareness of play and reciprocity in the learning process. You will not be assisted by an ‘instructor’. To complete each task, you will have to be imaginative and resourceful, working closely together and learn from each other. The workshop will engage performative forms of ritual interaction and ecstatic mutuality normally found in gaming, for the purposes of learning how we learn.This workshop is predicated on a ludic theory of ‘decisions’ as reciprocal and enmeshed game-rules governing how actants interact. Playing the game leads to the rules being revised and updated, offering fresh game-theoretic insights. This autotelism relates to our perception of Shift/Work as an iterative process, a set of workshops that can be continually re-performed like a musical score.

This Shift/Workshop is restricted to 12 participants to ensure that each group is small enough to form a playful bond (preventing ‘committee’ decision-making) but large enough to require negotiation and consensus building.

This Shift/Workshop will be based in two studios at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop edinburghsculpture.org

Anyone can take part. No prior knowledge or preparation is required.

Keywords: Decision-making, Paragogy, Workshopping, PAR (Participatory action-research), OER (Open Educational Resources).

Register via Eventbrite

Contact Dan Brown: 0131 551 4490

WHEN
Friday, 19 February 2016 from 09:30 to 16:30 (GMT) – Add to Calendar
WHERE
Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop – 21 Hawthornvale. 19th Feb 2016 (09:30-16:30). Edinburgh EH6 4JT GB – View Map

"Sometimes your past comes back to haunt you and drags you back in to help track yourself down."