Category Archives: Talks

Marvin Gaye Chetwynd

The Guest:The Host Detail

 

 

Neil Mulholland – The Guest/The Host

EAF Postcard for Marvin Gaye Chetwynd

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Interview: Marvin Gaye Chetwynd

Sunday, 23 August 2015 from 11:30 to 12:30 (BST)

Edinburgh Art Festival Kiosk, Blair Street

Edinburgh, Scotland

Neomedieval Aesthetics in the 21st Century

@neoflagellants Panel 141 @IMC_Leeds 6th July 2015: 11.15-12.45 Neomedieval Aesthetics in the 21st Century https://t.co/kIQwdwTUIA

Medieval archetypes such as pilgrimage, liturgy, anchoritism, relic-ing, alchemy, banquetry, palimpsesting, mumming, compagnonnage, gifting and commoning are popular practices and themes in contemporary art. Why are so many artists mobilising metahistorical anachronisms to explore their contemporaneity – recalibrating and reactivating a variety of premodern ideas as vehicles of renewal – in ways that are best described as neomedieval? This panel of artist-theorists will speculate on neomedievalism’s aesthetic potentialities, from the elasticated loops and folds it presses on our ideas about history, to the untimely visions of differing non-modern futures it can help us to invoke.

Atelier: Making Research Material Across the Creative Arts & Social Sciences

2/6/15 I gave two short presentations at the ISRF Workshop: Social Science as Communication #Summerhall #Edinburgh http://t.co/yikqyqNS4i on:

Atelier: Making Research Material Across the Creative Arts & Social Sciences

In recent years, there has been a growing concern with materiality as a field of enquiry across the arts, humanities and social sciences. Not to be confused with the field of ‘material culture studies’, or with ‘historical materialism’, emerging research calls into question the binarism and anthropocentrism of critical theory and the cultural turn. The ‘new materialisms’, in their different ways, speculate on how things are material, singular and/or entangled. They have radically redefined post-human politics, agency, corporeality, criticality, representation, and time. In response to these concerns, a group of colleagues from the University of Edinburgh’s College of Humanities & Social Sciences established an Atelier, a network of arts and social sciences scholars and staff from museums and art galleries in Scotland.

Aims:

Our meetings have foregrounded a number of ways in which disciplines within CHSS and our non-HEI partners each have their own protocols and methods for making material available for study in the form of objects. Yet, as we make radically distinct objects from the same material, what remains to be formulated within this multidisciplinary field are the concepts, equipment, and techniques that would generate the truly collaborative ability to fabricate common research objects.

How will the work be carried out?

Atelier members in Social Anthropology (SPS, UoE) and the School of Art (ECA, UoE) recently formalised their research processes, academic and non-academic partnerships in the form of a network project entitled Atelier: Making Research Material Across the Arts and Social Sciences. The aim of the network is to develop models of making phentermine and enquiry that can bring together often separate visual and material research practices within the social sciences and humanities through the creation of an ‘Atelier’. Our Atelier is a commons that allows us to make shared research ‘objects’ through collaborative research practices.  

A series of charrettes – participatory workshops involving interested colleagues across UoE and partners in the museum and gallery sector – will, in turn, focus on a particular object that will facilitate and contrast different methods of material enquiry. By engaging with ’things’ in the custody/field of our non-academic partners the charrettes will enable us to map and improve conditions for cross-disciplinary collaboration, shifting the emphasis away from doing research towards the creation of research objects. 

Crafting Values: Art and its Economies | Confraternity of Neoflagellants

January 23, 2015

School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh (Hunter Lecture Theatre), 10.00 am

with Hans Abbing, Evangelos Chrysagis, The Confraternity of Neoflaggelants (Norman James Hogg and Neil Mulholland), Angela McClanahan, Georgios Papadopoulos, Stevphen Shukaitis, Marina Vishmidt

Taking its cue from debates surrounding the contested character of value in artistic production, this one-day symposium presents an interdisciplinary take on the issue by bringing together scholarship from the fields of anthropology, art and critical theory, Marxism and economics. Some of the areas that the participants will address include the following:

Aesthetic value and processes of urban regeneration

Speculation and art production

Ethical values and economies of affect

Emotional labour, entrepreneurialism and self-precarization

Technologies of value and digital media

Neo-medievalism and hyper-economies

The 6th Annual Steven Campbell Trust Lecture

The Four Seasons: MacInnes over Africa 

African Affair Install
Words: Dr Pru Forrest, Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales.

Images: Angus B. MacInnes African Affair paintings (2013-14). 

My presentation for the Steven Campbell Trust Lecture at CCA, Glasgow. (10 mins)

Catalogue available from Hour Projects, Copenhagen

The Steven Campbell Trust are delighted to announce that artist Ross Sinclair will be giving the sixth annual Steven Campbell Trust Lecture. 

In the role of emcee, Ross Sinclair will be joined by artists, writers, curators and educators; Ellis Luxemburg, Rebecca Gordon-Nesbitt, Jim Colquhoun, David Harding and Neil Mulholland to cast a critical eye over the current state of the visual arts community flourishing in the shadow of the much used (and abused) paradigm of ‘The Glasgow Miracle’.

The Scotland-wide GENERATION project is currently celebrating the development of contemporary art in Scotland over the last 25 years. It has brought exhibitions and projects by over 100 artists to over 60 galleries around the country including landmark installations by both Ross Sinclair and Steven Campbell. To coincide, the BBC produced Scotland’s Art Revolution: The Maverick Generation, featuring Sinclair and contemporaries, charting the development of the recent Scottish scene. But can these kind of large scale, media positioned, centrally funded events ever hope to reflect what’s really going on? Let’s find out.

Sinclair has worked for the past couple of years on an AHRC funded project with Francis McKee, Director of CCA, in partnership with The Glasgow School of Art: The Glasgow Miracle- Materials for Alternative Histories. The project has explored and rationalised existing archival material from the Third Eye Centre and CCA (material spanning the period 1972- the present) and through which Sinclair has conducted an ongoing series of long form interviews with artists building an archive for future historians: http://glasgowmiracle.blogspot.co.uk