Category Archives: Books

This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk

This is not a book about Gavin Turk

Inspired by the art of Gavin Turk and the ideas in culture his work explores, This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk is a collection of essays that reflect on big philosophical questions relating to art & life by way of small forensic details relating to apple cores, union jacks, Che Guevara t-shirts, doors and more commissioned at the request of the artist.
This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk features thought-provoking and playful reflections on everything from advertising to Ariadne, chewing gum to celebrity, eggs to endgames and Sid Vicious to signatures written by an illustrious collection of art critics, novelists, cultural commentators, artists and psychoanalysts. Some of these essays refer directly to Turk’s work; many do not.

Contributors to This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk include Damien Hirst, Hardy Blechman, Sebastian Horsley, Jon Savage, Fiona Banner, Bob& Roberta Smith, Matthew Collings, Neil Mulholland, Darian Leader, Hari Kunzru, James Flint, Mark Stephens, Jessica Voorsanger, Richard Strange, Josie Barnard and many more. It will be published by Trolley in Spring 2014.

http://rachelnewsome.co.uk/this-is-not-a-book-about-gavin-turk/

http://www.amazon.com/This-Book-About-Gavin-Turk/dp/1907112278

http://shop.gavinturk.com/products/this-is-not-a-book-about-gavin-turk

thN Lng folk 2go

20130709-101446 AM.jpg
Punctum Books:

thN Lng folk 2go
by The Confraternity of Neoflagellants
with a Preface by Simon O’Sullivan

Iz thri riwles:

Die earste riwle speketh ov journie — iz al outward, ant riwles de body. Schulen ov swucche thinges az flk bear thmselvs outward; eat, drunch ant werke.
Dis riwle speketh ov anchorit. Schulen ov ascetic.
Die thridde riwle speketh ov host. Schulen ov embody ant transfigure.

Neomedievalisms are cultural practices that breathe a bouquet of premoderns as permanent rehearsals of coming events. Where medievalists may be prone to police the post-medieval weald for ‘inauthentic’ medievalisms, neomedievalists embrace the articulation and mobilisation of metahistorical ‘anachronisms’. To the medievalist, medievalisms provide powerful indexes that reveal how post-medieval societies have variously imagined ‘little middle ages’ to suit modern agendas. To the neomedievalist, medievalisms are theory-fictions that facilitate ludic speculation on non-modern futurities.
While neomedievalist theories have emerged in a variety of fields since the early 1970s — notably in cultural studies of medievalisms, international relations and literary theory — there are few applications that synthesise and put the methodologies of these diverse fields into practice. thN Lng folk 2go applies this extant scholarship as an extradisciplinary practice, dramatising the neomedieval turn in (quasi)objects, persons, work, education, travel, food, ethnicity, media, art, hypereconomics and technology. This speculative journey is ghost authored by a trinity of neomedievalist narrators — Journeyman, Anchorite and Host — each relic-ing their own curious neomedieval futurities.

Drawing its heterogeneous approaches from studies in medievalisms, international relations, literary theory, actor-network theory, anthropology, hypereconomics, art history, aesthetics, ecology, cultural theory, cultural geography, ambience, speculative realism and future studies — thN Lng folk 2go is both an investigation of and a benefaction to a murmuration of neomedievalisms.

thN lng flk 2go iz an boke in fif bokes:

I. L’Amérique Souterraine

Dis earste dale speketh iter pro peregrinis ad metro. Dis boc iz todealet in fif leasse bokes ov journie-men Gambini’s 2 doze hu Lng 2 g0. Iz earste riwle ant ov swucche thinges az duble homo-feaste, drunch ant werke, ant iz ov othre (dug-heids) ant quazi-thinges.

II. Imperium et Sacerdotium

Dis other dale speketh ov nuncii ant procuratores, ov assemblies ant crusades.

III. The Journeyman’s Guide to Anchoritism

Dis thridde dale iz’ov translatione corporis. Dis dale iz ov customz, liturgica, blak noiz, ant self-discipline ov d post-homo man-thinge. Dis boc iz todealet in thri leasse bokes ov ancre’s wittes.

IV. xyzzy: Contemporary Art Before and After Britain

Dis feorthe dale iz’ov beatific ant ov swucche thinges az doth come from the eye’s arrows. Ad te levavi.

V. When Transfiguration Became Commonplace

Dis fifte dale speketh ov host. Dis dale is al of the thridde riwle, wen translatione bcAM hyper-economicus.

*Dis boke is supported by the Carnegie
Trust for the Universities of Scotland

The Confraternity of Neoflagellants are lay peoples dedicated to the ascetic investigation, application, dissemination and treatment of neomedievalisms. The Confraternity of Neoflagellants was founded in 2009 by Serjeant-At-Law Norman Hogg (Université Montréal, Québec) and joined by Keeper of the Wardrobe Neil Mulholland (Université Édimbourg, Écosse). It is a secular and equal opportunities confraternity bound by chirograph.

Follow the Confraternity on Twitter: @neoflagellants

Confraternity Website

Bang the Whole Gang

‘Bang the Whole Gang’, is my chapter on glam for Tate Liverpool’s current exhibition catalogue:

Glam! The Performance of Style

Tate Liverpool

8 February – 12 May 2013
£8.00/£6.00 (Gift Aid with donation)

Irreverent and visually excessive, the Glam era is to be critically re-evaluated for the first time in an ambitious new exhibition at Tate Liverpool. Glam, an extravagant pop style which exploded across Britainduring the years 1971 – 5, embraced high and low culture whilst playing with identity and gender definitions. Moving beyond nostalgia, Glam! The Performance of Style will be the first ever exhibition to trace the avant-garde genealogy of Glam, examining its relationship to painting, sculpture, film, performance and installation art in Britain, across Europe and in North America.

Glam emerged in 1971 as the avant-garde pop product par excellence, with the work and ideas of major artists such as Richard Hamilton and Andy Warhol contributing to this. Drawing on avant-garde ideas, key Glam performers such as David Bowie and Roxy Music played with androgyny and conjured an ultra artificial aesthetic which synthesised past styles. This postmodernist style was presented through the optic of the near future with space-age connotations. In a period of enormous social and political unrest, Glam remained detached, seductive yet tantalisingly unattainable.

The exhibition will uncover a repressed aesthetic, revealing the hitherto under-acknowledged exchange between the radical art of the era and Glam expression. Emphasis will fall on performance, in particular ideas of dandyism, exaggerated identity and drag. Included will be works such as Gilbert & George’s iconic video Portrait of the Artists as Young Men 1972, which presents an ultra stylised pose of Gilbert & George as self-conscious decadents. Artists’ use of materials such as vinyl and glitter will be considered, mirroring or allegorising the conventions of Glam, as demonstrated by Marc-Camille Chaimowicz’s Glam-infused theatrical scatter environment Celebration? Realife 1972/2000. The exhibition will also explore how the era provided a backdrop for artists such as Margaret Harrison to assert their identity, often exaggerating and satirising cultural values of beauty and glamour.

Combining historical and thematic elements, Glam! The Performance of Style will bring together important artworks created in a range of media, alongside key documents and photographs, to emphasise the continuing influence of Glam on the contemporary imagination. It will address the under-acknowledged role of Glam in aesthetic and cultural discourse, offering a more comprehensive and nuanced representation of 1970s art.

Glam! The Performance of Style is curated by Darren Pih, Exhibitions and Displays Curator, Tate Liverpool and will tour to the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt (June to September 2013) and Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz (October 2013 to January 2014).

Lily of Blythenhale

Lily of Blythenhale
Andro Semeiko

Artist Book Launch and Talk

Saturday 3 December 15.00 – 17.00
Talk by Donald Rayfield at 16.00

Lily of Blythenhale is an artist book, which tells a multilayered visual story by Jessica Wilkes Award holder Andro Semeiko. The images and texts in Lily of Blythenhale can be seen as illustrations of each other as well as randomly assembled articles. The book is created in collaboration with Daniel Harbour, cognitive scientist specialising in language, Norman Hogg, artist, writer and curator, Neil Mulholland, art historian and art critic, Dushko Petrovich, artist and writer, Arron Sands, artist, writer and curator, and Shelley von Strunckel, astrologer and writer. It is published by Acme Studios.

The publication reflects on ideas of knowledge acquisition, power and chivalry. It contains images of marine paintings with Turneresque treatment of light referring to old sketches and maps of the East coast and the Thames. Portraits borrow poses and gestures from van Dyke’s work, and architectural paintings refer to Inigo Jones’ Paladian buildings in the capital and his decorative French fleur-de-lis railings.

Andro Semeiko is a Russo-Georgian now resident in the UK and the book is another dimension of his current exhibition Lily of Blythenhale at the Acme Project Space. The installation tells a story through painting, drawing, sculpture and archival material working as props for a mise-en-scène.

The Lily of Blythenhale book will be launched during the exhibition at the Acme Project Space and will be accompanied by a talk on chivalry/raindoba in Georgian culture and history given by Donald Rayfield Professor of Russian and Georgian at Queen Mary University.

A Russian samovar will be laid out and Georgian tea and cakes will be served.

Installation shots of Lily of Blythenhale at the Acme Project Space.
Lily of Blythenhale
Andro Semeiko
Acme Project Space
11 November – 11 December 2011
Opening hours: 13.00 – 18.00 Thursday – Sunday

Andro Semeiko is the third recipient of the Jessica Wilkes Award; a major professional development opportunity established by Acme Studios and Jessica’s family and friends to celebrate the life of former Acme tenant Jessica Wilkes who died in 2006. The year-long award provides an artist with a free studio and grant to enable them to devote more of their time to their studio practice.

Acme Project Space 44 Bonner Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9JS
T 020 8981 6811 E mail@acme.org.uk W www.acme.org.uk/projectspace.php

Radical Scotland: Arguments for Self-Determination

I have a chapter (‘The Challenge of Self-Determination’) in Gerry Hassan’s and Rosie Ilett’s new book, out on the 8th of March 2011.

Radical Scotland: Arguments for Self-Determination

The era of devolution as we have known it is over. Radical Scotland challenges conventional wisdoms, and poses solutions which encourage us to become more active agents of our own destiny.

Scotland believes it is a radical, egalitarian, inclusive nation. It was hoped that the establishment of the Scottish Parliament was going to give expression to this. Instead, we have witnessed a minimal, unattractive politics with little to choose between the main parties. This might be adequate in the good times, but no more.

Radical Scotland: Arguments for Self-Determination explores how we can go beyond the limited politics we have experienced and makes the case for shifting from self-government politically to self-determination as a society and a nation. It asks how do we shake up institutional Scotland? How do we shift power and give people voice?

The editors Gerry Hassan and Rosie Ilett have brought together in one volume some of the most original thinkers in our nation making the case for a very different politics and society. It includes conversations with leading global figures on some of the key issues facing the world which impact on Scotland. This book is a must read for all those interested in Scotland at a crucial time, for its future, the Parliament, and for those who want our politics and public policy to be more effective, imaginative and bold.

http://www.luath.co.uk/acatalog/Radical_Scotland.html

Slides from State of Play

Venice: The State of Scottish Art

I’m in the process of editing some of the ideas in this talk for Gerry Hassan’s forthcoming book on Self-Determination. As Gerry says: “The aim of the book is a political and cultural one; in some small way – shifting the debate in Scotland and shifting how we think about power; while also contextualising Scotland in a wider environment – with a series of international conversations.” A pre-publication conference will be held at Strathclyde University, Glasgow in November.