Category Archives: Confraternity of Neoflagellants

Borderlands

Borderlands: The Historical and Cultural Significance of the Anglo-Scottish Border

13 December 2013

Gallery North, Northumbria University, Friday December 13th 2013.
Convened by Dr Ysanne Holt (Northumbria University) and Dr Angela McClanahan (Edinburgh College of Art)

This event, the first in the ESRC Seminar Series – ‘Close Friends?’ Assessing the impact of greater Scottish autonomy on the North of England – brings to the fore concerns shared with the AHRC Research Network, ‘Northern Peripheries’

To locate the contemporary relationship between Scotland and the North of England within a wider historical and cultural context, the seminar will consider how the North?s sense of itself as a region has been conditioned by its position in the hinterland of the Scottish Border. Representations and interpretations of ‘place’ are important. Discussions will also engage with recent cultural debates and creative practices concerned with the experience of Northern peripheries and border regions, spaces typically conceived as remote and marginal, but which can be alternatively seen as hybrid and generative spaces where dynamic and diverse networks develop.

Programme for the Day

10.30am – 10.50am Introduction: Professor Keith Shaw, Dr Ysanne Holt and Dr Angela McClanahan, ‘Borders and Borderlands’

11.00am – 11.40am Dr David Welsh (Historian) ‘The Anglo-Scottish Border Line’

11.50am – 12.30pm Professor Neil Mulholland (Edinburgh College of Art), ‘Unbundling the Border: Neomedieval North’

12.45pm – 1.15pm LUNCH

1.20pm – 2.00pm Dr Venda Pollock, Dr Karen Scott and Dr Frances Rowe (Newcastle University), ‘Northumbrian Exchanges: Art and the Rural’

2.00pm – 2.35pm Matt Baker, Artist and Curator of the Environmental Art Festival Scotland held in the Borders in September 2013, with filmmaker John Wallace, creator of the Cinema Sark, multi-screen video installation

3.00pm – 3.30pm TEA BREAK

3.45pm – 4.45pm Clare Money, (Northumbria University, Fine Art PhD), ‘Retrace: Deep mapping Riccarton’ and Professor Chris Dorsett (Northumbria University), ‘Gallery South’

Closing Discussion

thN Lng folk 2go: Investigating Future Premoderns™

thN_Lng_folk_2go_Cover_Final-216x349

thN Lng folk 2go: Investigating Future Premoderns™
by The Confraternity of Neoflagellants
with a Preface by Simon O’Sullivan
Brooklyn, NY: punctum books, 2013. 242 pages, illus. ISBN-13: 978-0615890258. OPEN-ACCESS e-book and $17.00 [€15.00/£12.00] in print: paperbound/5 X 8 in.

“At last, the rival Confraternity of SpeculativeRealism® has its missing subject! Here, the human-object/thing sits still-as-stone, dis-connected from one regime in order to connect to another. As such, this book is a contribution to Thing Theory, but of a very queer and wonky kind. An object-oriented ontology© on amphetamines and psilocybin.” (Simon O’Sullivan)

“There will be many things about this guide that you will not like. It might drive a bit too fast for comfort, especially because it has no seatbelts—the Journeyman’s Guide is open top and the roads to its anchorholds swerve all over the place. But you need to drive very fast to see things as things.” (Reviews, Proto-Bitch, Portland, OR)

Book launch tonight Halloween:

In the jousting field of Parc Mont Royale, near Chemin Olmsted, Montréal, QC H2W 1S8, Canada, at 19:00 EST Sergeant at Arms (Norman Hogg) will download a PDF of the book from punctumbooks.com/titles/thn-lng-folk (CAN$ 0) onto his Android cellphone and drink a toast from Horton’s cup.

At Cabaret Voltaire, Spiegelgasse 1, 8001 Zürich, Switzerland:
Keeper of the Wardrobe (Neil Mulholland) will launch the print copy of the book (€15) at 23:00 CET The first advanced print copy will be flagellated then burned, its ashes interned in the bin outside Cabaret Voltaire’s gift shop.

Hope to see you there!

thN Lng folk 2go

20130709-101446 AM.jpg
Punctum Books:

thN Lng folk 2go
by The Confraternity of Neoflagellants
with a Preface by Simon O’Sullivan

Iz thri riwles:

Die earste riwle speketh ov journie — iz al outward, ant riwles de body. Schulen ov swucche thinges az flk bear thmselvs outward; eat, drunch ant werke.
Dis riwle speketh ov anchorit. Schulen ov ascetic.
Die thridde riwle speketh ov host. Schulen ov embody ant transfigure.

Neomedievalisms are cultural practices that breathe a bouquet of premoderns as permanent rehearsals of coming events. Where medievalists may be prone to police the post-medieval weald for ‘inauthentic’ medievalisms, neomedievalists embrace the articulation and mobilisation of metahistorical ‘anachronisms’. To the medievalist, medievalisms provide powerful indexes that reveal how post-medieval societies have variously imagined ‘little middle ages’ to suit modern agendas. To the neomedievalist, medievalisms are theory-fictions that facilitate ludic speculation on non-modern futurities.
While neomedievalist theories have emerged in a variety of fields since the early 1970s — notably in cultural studies of medievalisms, international relations and literary theory — there are few applications that synthesise and put the methodologies of these diverse fields into practice. thN Lng folk 2go applies this extant scholarship as an extradisciplinary practice, dramatising the neomedieval turn in (quasi)objects, persons, work, education, travel, food, ethnicity, media, art, hypereconomics and technology. This speculative journey is ghost authored by a trinity of neomedievalist narrators — Journeyman, Anchorite and Host — each relic-ing their own curious neomedieval futurities.

Drawing its heterogeneous approaches from studies in medievalisms, international relations, literary theory, actor-network theory, anthropology, hypereconomics, art history, aesthetics, ecology, cultural theory, cultural geography, ambience, speculative realism and future studies — thN Lng folk 2go is both an investigation of and a benefaction to a murmuration of neomedievalisms.

thN lng flk 2go iz an boke in fif bokes:

I. L’Amérique Souterraine

Dis earste dale speketh iter pro peregrinis ad metro. Dis boc iz todealet in fif leasse bokes ov journie-men Gambini’s 2 doze hu Lng 2 g0. Iz earste riwle ant ov swucche thinges az duble homo-feaste, drunch ant werke, ant iz ov othre (dug-heids) ant quazi-thinges.

II. Imperium et Sacerdotium

Dis other dale speketh ov nuncii ant procuratores, ov assemblies ant crusades.

III. The Journeyman’s Guide to Anchoritism

Dis thridde dale iz’ov translatione corporis. Dis dale iz ov customz, liturgica, blak noiz, ant self-discipline ov d post-homo man-thinge. Dis boc iz todealet in thri leasse bokes ov ancre’s wittes.

IV. xyzzy: Contemporary Art Before and After Britain

Dis feorthe dale iz’ov beatific ant ov swucche thinges az doth come from the eye’s arrows. Ad te levavi.

V. When Transfiguration Became Commonplace

Dis fifte dale speketh ov host. Dis dale is al of the thridde riwle, wen translatione bcAM hyper-economicus.

*Dis boke is supported by the Carnegie
Trust for the Universities of Scotland

The Confraternity of Neoflagellants are lay peoples dedicated to the ascetic investigation, application, dissemination and treatment of neomedievalisms. The Confraternity of Neoflagellants was founded in 2009 by Serjeant-At-Law Norman Hogg (Université Montréal, Québec) and joined by Keeper of the Wardrobe Neil Mulholland (Université Édimbourg, Écosse). It is a secular and equal opportunities confraternity bound by chirograph.

Follow the Confraternity on Twitter: @neoflagellants

Confraternity Website

The Middle Ages in the Modern World

Thekary of The Eliasson

Confraternity of Neoflagellants are giving a paper at: The Middle Ages in the Modern World

University of St Andrews, Scotland, 25-28 June, 2013
A multidisciplinary conference on medievalism in the post-Middle Ages

Conference registration

Keynote speakers

Carolyn Dinshaw (New York University): The Green Man and the Modern World
Patrick Geary (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton): European ethnicity: Does Europe have too much past?
Seamus Heaney (Nobel Prize-winning poet): Translating medieval poetry
Bruce Holsinger (University of Virginia): The politics of medievalism
Felicitas Hoppe (Author and translator): Adapting medieval romance
Terry Jones (Author and broadcaster): Columbus, America and the flat earth
James Robinson (National Museums Scotland): Saints’ cults and celebrity: The medieval legacy

Other presentations selected from over 150 proposals by academics, writers, curators and musicians from 17 countries include:
Medievalism, masculinity, and authenticity in Game of Thrones; Spenser and the legacy of the later Middle Ages; North American High Crosses; Remembering Thomas Becket in Normandy; William Wright’s work for the Palaeographical Society; A Byzantine methodology for pop culture; The Middle Ages of World War I; Hermaphrodites, history, and the politics of intersex; How the 19th century still haunts the Middle Ages; Assisi’s May festival and its Fascist founder; The origins of the medieval commercial revolution in 20th-century war, exile, and genocide; The state and place of medieval studies in the university; The medieval imaginary in popular Brazilian literature; 19th- century replicas and the generation of visions of early medieval peoples; The 800th anniversary of the Studium generale of Palencia; Terrorism and the Medieval; Representing the Middle Ages in historical grand strategy computer games; Korean translation of Beowulf; The creation of medieval Scottish music history in the 18th and early 19th centuries; The comic medievalism of the internet meme; Antiquarian furniture and the ‘Modern Gothic’ in eighteenth-century Britain; Medievalism and “Touristic Capital”; What medieval sacramental theology has to say about marriage today; Alliteration in contemporary poetry; History by contact; Present uses (and abuses) of the term “Spain” related to the Middle Ages; Christianity, Islam and the persistence of mythmaking.

Any enquiries are welcome to mamo@st-andrews.ac.uk. Organisers: Claire Pascolini-Campbell, with Chris Jones (School of English) and Bettina Bildhauer (School of Modern Languages), University of St Andrews.

Three Little Neomedievalisms, OCAD, Toronto

Plastique Fantastique Ribbon Dance Ritual to Call Forth the Pre-Industrial Modern (2007)

Ontario College of Art & Design

Lecture Room 7401

205 Richmond Street West

Toronto

Monday 22nd April 2:00-3:00pm,

Neomedievalism is not a singular theory but, rather, a series of provocative analogies for conceptualising post-Soviet geopolitics, globalisation, creative economics and aesthetics. This lecture will consider how we might apply three theories of neomedievalism to the study of contemporary art.

Neil is an art historian, curator and artist. His historical research focuses on art practice and theory in the British Isles since the 1970s while his practice incorporates art writing, developing workshop models of artistic learning in participatory settings, and the field of neomedievalism. Recent publications include thN Lng folk 2go (Punctum, forthcoming 2013), co-authored with Norman Hogg, and ‘Bang the Whole Gang’ in Glam: The Performance of Style (TATE, 2013).

confraternityofneoflagellants.org.uk