Category Archives: Confraternity of Neoflagellants

The Middle Ages in the Modern World

Thekary of The Eliasson

Confraternity of Neoflagellants are giving a paper at: The Middle Ages in the Modern World

University of St Andrews, Scotland, 25-28 June, 2013
A multidisciplinary conference on medievalism in the post-Middle Ages

Conference registration

Keynote speakers

Carolyn Dinshaw (New York University): The Green Man and the Modern World
Patrick Geary (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton): European ethnicity: Does Europe have too much past?
Seamus Heaney (Nobel Prize-winning poet): Translating medieval poetry
Bruce Holsinger (University of Virginia): The politics of medievalism
Felicitas Hoppe (Author and translator): Adapting medieval romance
Terry Jones (Author and broadcaster): Columbus, America and the flat earth
James Robinson (National Museums Scotland): Saints’ cults and celebrity: The medieval legacy

Other presentations selected from over 150 proposals by academics, writers, curators and musicians from 17 countries include:
Medievalism, masculinity, and authenticity in Game of Thrones; Spenser and the legacy of the later Middle Ages; North American High Crosses; Remembering Thomas Becket in Normandy; William Wright’s work for the Palaeographical Society; A Byzantine methodology for pop culture; The Middle Ages of World War I; Hermaphrodites, history, and the politics of intersex; How the 19th century still haunts the Middle Ages; Assisi’s May festival and its Fascist founder; The origins of the medieval commercial revolution in 20th-century war, exile, and genocide; The state and place of medieval studies in the university; The medieval imaginary in popular Brazilian literature; 19th- century replicas and the generation of visions of early medieval peoples; The 800th anniversary of the Studium generale of Palencia; Terrorism and the Medieval; Representing the Middle Ages in historical grand strategy computer games; Korean translation of Beowulf; The creation of medieval Scottish music history in the 18th and early 19th centuries; The comic medievalism of the internet meme; Antiquarian furniture and the ‘Modern Gothic’ in eighteenth-century Britain; Medievalism and “Touristic Capital”; What medieval sacramental theology has to say about marriage today; Alliteration in contemporary poetry; History by contact; Present uses (and abuses) of the term “Spain” related to the Middle Ages; Christianity, Islam and the persistence of mythmaking.

Any enquiries are welcome to mamo@st-andrews.ac.uk. Organisers: Claire Pascolini-Campbell, with Chris Jones (School of English) and Bettina Bildhauer (School of Modern Languages), University of St Andrews.

Three Little Neomedievalisms, OCAD, Toronto

Plastique Fantastique Ribbon Dance Ritual to Call Forth the Pre-Industrial Modern (2007)

Ontario College of Art & Design

Lecture Room 7401

205 Richmond Street West

Toronto

Monday 22nd April 2:00-3:00pm,

Neomedievalism is not a singular theory but, rather, a series of provocative analogies for conceptualising post-Soviet geopolitics, globalisation, creative economics and aesthetics. This lecture will consider how we might apply three theories of neomedievalism to the study of contemporary art.

Neil is an art historian, curator and artist. His historical research focuses on art practice and theory in the British Isles since the 1970s while his practice incorporates art writing, developing workshop models of artistic learning in participatory settings, and the field of neomedievalism. Recent publications include thN Lng folk 2go (Punctum, forthcoming 2013), co-authored with Norman Hogg, and ‘Bang the Whole Gang’ in Glam: The Performance of Style (TATE, 2013).

confraternityofneoflagellants.org.uk

 

Neoflagellation at PNCA, Portland OR.

Pacific Northwest College of Art

1241 NW Johnson Street, Pearl District

Portland, OR 97209. USA.

April 11th 12:30-1:30, Room 118

PNCAmulholland

Neomedievalism is not a singular theory but, rather, a series of provocative analogies for conceptualising post-Soviet geopolitics, globalisation, creative economics and aesthetics. This lecture will consider how we might apply unrelated theories of neomedievalism to the study of contemporary art in Britain.

Neil is an art historian, curator and artist. His historical research focuses on art practice and theory in the British Isles since the 1970s while his practice incorporates art writing, developing workshop models of artistic learning in participatory settings, and the field of neomedievalism. Recent publications include thN Lng folk 2go (Punctum, forthcoming 2013), co-authored with Norman Hogg, and ‘Bang the Whole Gang’ in Glam: The Performance of Style (TATE, 2013).

confraternityofneoflagellants.org.uk

 

Lily of Blythenhale

Lily of Blythenhale
Andro Semeiko

Artist Book Launch and Talk

Saturday 3 December 15.00 – 17.00
Talk by Donald Rayfield at 16.00

Lily of Blythenhale is an artist book, which tells a multilayered visual story by Jessica Wilkes Award holder Andro Semeiko. The images and texts in Lily of Blythenhale can be seen as illustrations of each other as well as randomly assembled articles. The book is created in collaboration with Daniel Harbour, cognitive scientist specialising in language, Norman Hogg, artist, writer and curator, Neil Mulholland, art historian and art critic, Dushko Petrovich, artist and writer, Arron Sands, artist, writer and curator, and Shelley von Strunckel, astrologer and writer. It is published by Acme Studios.

The publication reflects on ideas of knowledge acquisition, power and chivalry. It contains images of marine paintings with Turneresque treatment of light referring to old sketches and maps of the East coast and the Thames. Portraits borrow poses and gestures from van Dyke’s work, and architectural paintings refer to Inigo Jones’ Paladian buildings in the capital and his decorative French fleur-de-lis railings.

Andro Semeiko is a Russo-Georgian now resident in the UK and the book is another dimension of his current exhibition Lily of Blythenhale at the Acme Project Space. The installation tells a story through painting, drawing, sculpture and archival material working as props for a mise-en-scène.

The Lily of Blythenhale book will be launched during the exhibition at the Acme Project Space and will be accompanied by a talk on chivalry/raindoba in Georgian culture and history given by Donald Rayfield Professor of Russian and Georgian at Queen Mary University.

A Russian samovar will be laid out and Georgian tea and cakes will be served.

Installation shots of Lily of Blythenhale at the Acme Project Space.
Lily of Blythenhale
Andro Semeiko
Acme Project Space
11 November – 11 December 2011
Opening hours: 13.00 – 18.00 Thursday – Sunday

Andro Semeiko is the third recipient of the Jessica Wilkes Award; a major professional development opportunity established by Acme Studios and Jessica’s family and friends to celebrate the life of former Acme tenant Jessica Wilkes who died in 2006. The year-long award provides an artist with a free studio and grant to enable them to devote more of their time to their studio practice.

Acme Project Space 44 Bonner Road, Bethnal Green, London E2 9JS
T 020 8981 6811 E mail@acme.org.uk W www.acme.org.uk/projectspace.php