Category Archives: Akadēmeia

Scottish Independents

Scottish Independents

 

This democratisation of the intellect is our inheritance (not least since we have already paid for it), our creative commons; it is what enables us to innovate and to engage transnationally.

This is an invaluable and ambitious international role for interdependent organisations to play.

The history of artists’ cultural self-determination is linked and made stronger by that of making real the promise of political self-determination.

12:00 Friday 18th November 2011

Lecture Theatre

Royal College of Art, Sculpture School Project Space, 15-25 Howie Street Battersea

Followed by a presentation by Siesta Pinwheel.

Present Absent

‘Present Absent’

Follow the link to download: http://cs.anendlesssupply.co.uk/content/5.projects/9.19-08-11/19-08-2011.pdf

Countersituation is the title of an ongoing series of weekly published pages, initiated by An Endless Supply with Adam Smythe. Each issue is a double-sided sheet of new writing, simultaneously printed and distributed in short-runs and available online as a PDF.

Countersituation will appear weekly online at cs.anendlesssupply.co.uk and, from 23 July to 27 August 2011, in printed form at Galerie8, 195-205 Richmond Road, London E8 3NJ.

No One Driving (Redux) at Performing Art History

performing research: Art history not for publicationA conference organised by the Performing Art History Special Interest Group
Friday 6 May 201112.00 -18.15, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Speaker(s): Thomas Ardill (Tate), Emma Cheatle (University College London), Diana Cheng (McGill University, School of Architecture), James Day (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Martin Hammer (University of Edinburgh), Jim Harris (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Jack Hartnell (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Becky Hunter (University of York), Ayla Lepine (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Maria Loh (University College London), Carol Mavor (University of Manchester), Nicola Moorby (Tate), Neil Mulholland (Edinburgh College of Art), Michelle Rumney (Independent artist), Katie Scott (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission, but please book in advance, preferably by 12 noon Wednesday 4 May

Organised by: Jack Hartnell with Dr Katie Scott (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Whilst the methodologies of art history have been subjected to radical critique and constant renewal since the 1970s, our conceptualisation of research aims and our expression of research outcomes have remained remarkably limited, static, and conventional.

In an attempt to address this imbalance, Performing Research will look beyond traditional methods of delivering art history, reaffirming the live lecture as a unique moment to communicate the wide-ranging subjects of the discipline in ways that redirect attention from theory in the abstract to the media and practices of art history.

Through the innovative use of image, text, sound, film, performance, and digital technologies, the papers will begin to redraw the parameters of art history through the media in which it is embedded. Showcasing radical and self-conscious experimentation with instruments of presentation that are already extending the discipline, the conference allows dynamic new relationships to emerge between the ways of presenting information and that information itself.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2010/summer/may6_PerformingArtHistory.shtml

Radical Scotland: Arguments for Self-Determination

I have a chapter (‘The Challenge of Self-Determination’) in Gerry Hassan’s and Rosie Ilett’s new book, out on the 8th of March 2011.

Radical Scotland: Arguments for Self-Determination

The era of devolution as we have known it is over. Radical Scotland challenges conventional wisdoms, and poses solutions which encourage us to become more active agents of our own destiny.

Scotland believes it is a radical, egalitarian, inclusive nation. It was hoped that the establishment of the Scottish Parliament was going to give expression to this. Instead, we have witnessed a minimal, unattractive politics with little to choose between the main parties. This might be adequate in the good times, but no more.

Radical Scotland: Arguments for Self-Determination explores how we can go beyond the limited politics we have experienced and makes the case for shifting from self-government politically to self-determination as a society and a nation. It asks how do we shake up institutional Scotland? How do we shift power and give people voice?

The editors Gerry Hassan and Rosie Ilett have brought together in one volume some of the most original thinkers in our nation making the case for a very different politics and society. It includes conversations with leading global figures on some of the key issues facing the world which impact on Scotland. This book is a must read for all those interested in Scotland at a crucial time, for its future, the Parliament, and for those who want our politics and public policy to be more effective, imaginative and bold.

http://www.luath.co.uk/acatalog/Radical_Scotland.html