Category Archives: Prose

This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk

This is not a book about Gavin Turk

Inspired by the art of Gavin Turk and the ideas in culture his work explores, This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk is a collection of essays that reflect on big philosophical questions relating to art & life by way of small forensic details relating to apple cores, union jacks, Che Guevara t-shirts, doors and more commissioned at the request of the artist.
This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk features thought-provoking and playful reflections on everything from advertising to Ariadne, chewing gum to celebrity, eggs to endgames and Sid Vicious to signatures written by an illustrious collection of art critics, novelists, cultural commentators, artists and psychoanalysts. Some of these essays refer directly to Turk’s work; many do not.

Contributors to This Is Not A Book About Gavin Turk include Damien Hirst, Hardy Blechman, Sebastian Horsley, Jon Savage, Fiona Banner, Bob& Roberta Smith, Matthew Collings, Neil Mulholland, Darian Leader, Hari Kunzru, James Flint, Mark Stephens, Jessica Voorsanger, Richard Strange, Josie Barnard and many more. It will be published by Trolley in Spring 2014.

http://rachelnewsome.co.uk/this-is-not-a-book-about-gavin-turk/

http://www.amazon.com/This-Book-About-Gavin-Turk/dp/1907112278

http://shop.gavinturk.com/products/this-is-not-a-book-about-gavin-turk

thN Lng folk 2go

20130709-101446 AM.jpg
Punctum Books:

thN Lng folk 2go
by The Confraternity of Neoflagellants
with a Preface by Simon O’Sullivan

Iz thri riwles:

Die earste riwle speketh ov journie — iz al outward, ant riwles de body. Schulen ov swucche thinges az flk bear thmselvs outward; eat, drunch ant werke.
Dis riwle speketh ov anchorit. Schulen ov ascetic.
Die thridde riwle speketh ov host. Schulen ov embody ant transfigure.

Neomedievalisms are cultural practices that breathe a bouquet of premoderns as permanent rehearsals of coming events. Where medievalists may be prone to police the post-medieval weald for ‘inauthentic’ medievalisms, neomedievalists embrace the articulation and mobilisation of metahistorical ‘anachronisms’. To the medievalist, medievalisms provide powerful indexes that reveal how post-medieval societies have variously imagined ‘little middle ages’ to suit modern agendas. To the neomedievalist, medievalisms are theory-fictions that facilitate ludic speculation on non-modern futurities.
While neomedievalist theories have emerged in a variety of fields since the early 1970s — notably in cultural studies of medievalisms, international relations and literary theory — there are few applications that synthesise and put the methodologies of these diverse fields into practice. thN Lng folk 2go applies this extant scholarship as an extradisciplinary practice, dramatising the neomedieval turn in (quasi)objects, persons, work, education, travel, food, ethnicity, media, art, hypereconomics and technology. This speculative journey is ghost authored by a trinity of neomedievalist narrators — Journeyman, Anchorite and Host — each relic-ing their own curious neomedieval futurities.

Drawing its heterogeneous approaches from studies in medievalisms, international relations, literary theory, actor-network theory, anthropology, hypereconomics, art history, aesthetics, ecology, cultural theory, cultural geography, ambience, speculative realism and future studies — thN Lng folk 2go is both an investigation of and a benefaction to a murmuration of neomedievalisms.

thN lng flk 2go iz an boke in fif bokes:

I. L’Amérique Souterraine

Dis earste dale speketh iter pro peregrinis ad metro. Dis boc iz todealet in fif leasse bokes ov journie-men Gambini’s 2 doze hu Lng 2 g0. Iz earste riwle ant ov swucche thinges az duble homo-feaste, drunch ant werke, ant iz ov othre (dug-heids) ant quazi-thinges.

II. Imperium et Sacerdotium

Dis other dale speketh ov nuncii ant procuratores, ov assemblies ant crusades.

III. The Journeyman’s Guide to Anchoritism

Dis thridde dale iz’ov translatione corporis. Dis dale iz ov customz, liturgica, blak noiz, ant self-discipline ov d post-homo man-thinge. Dis boc iz todealet in thri leasse bokes ov ancre’s wittes.

IV. xyzzy: Contemporary Art Before and After Britain

Dis feorthe dale iz’ov beatific ant ov swucche thinges az doth come from the eye’s arrows. Ad te levavi.

V. When Transfiguration Became Commonplace

Dis fifte dale speketh ov host. Dis dale is al of the thridde riwle, wen translatione bcAM hyper-economicus.

*Dis boke is supported by the Carnegie
Trust for the Universities of Scotland

The Confraternity of Neoflagellants are lay peoples dedicated to the ascetic investigation, application, dissemination and treatment of neomedievalisms. The Confraternity of Neoflagellants was founded in 2009 by Serjeant-At-Law Norman Hogg (Université Montréal, Québec) and joined by Keeper of the Wardrobe Neil Mulholland (Université Édimbourg, Écosse). It is a secular and equal opportunities confraternity bound by chirograph.

Follow the Confraternity on Twitter: @neoflagellants

Confraternity Website

The Black Merkin

Contributed a page to The Black Merkin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Edbrook & Norman James Hogg invite you to celebrate the publication of a romance novel written by 170 individual authors.
This marks the culmination of a nine month project initiated as part of the New Work Scotland Programme 2010.

BAD ROMANCE was a crowd-sourced project managed by Laura Edbrook & Norman James Hogg under the transitory moniker New Society of Dilettanti. Edbrook and Hogg initiated the project during their writing commission for the 2010 New Work Scotland Programme at the Collective gallery in Edinburgh. The idea was to write an entire romance novel using a ‘tribal’ model of authorship.

The project began by randomly selecting one e-book from a downloaded bit-torrent of over 100 romance titles. This ‘template’ was then split into 170 sections of around 300 words each. An advert appeared in the NWSP newspaper, offering individuals the chance to ‘become a tribal author’ by participating in a mass reconstruction of the novel.

Participants rewrote sections in the manner and style of their choosing. They received only a few basic instructions, including a request to leave all character and place names intact. Over the course of nine months, the society managed the sending, receiving and editing of texts entirely through Google docs, until the last section was returned in July 2011. At this point, all character and place names were over¬written with new names using the ‘find and replace’ function.

The result is The Black Merkin—a ‘new’ novel bearing little if any resemblance to the donor text. It is equally a ‘broken’ novel; the unrestrained swarm of authorial impulsions hollows out narrative structure and coherence.

Step by Step Guide to Midsummer | Jo Robertson

Step by Step Guide to Midsummer

A difficult artist to grasp, it’s not my intention to elucidate the full range of Robertson’s misdemeanours and accomplishments. Others have done that both with dull employment and mischievous intensity; send them out as ambassadors! No. Where it seems appropriate, reach out to the creators, their appetites precede them. The search for a new kind of painting begins on a beach in the south of France, imagining seared peinture-mots produced by an artisan skilled in indulging barrenness.

Dabbed and squirted, a small proxy, about twice as good as it needs to be. Only a smaller piece of extra texture is displayed, and it doesn’t matter. No jaded and anonymous shills and pilferers for that mass of matter. One image on stretched canvas. The bonds rupture and the particles move on the surface of the image of an otherwise clothed body, the murmurings of the facture more delicate, magnificent, and tender than any minor historical masterstroke from the 1950s. Drawing strewn here and there. A pellucid bottle green echoes my erstwhile experience as a professional eater, one of pleasure, luxury, and abundance. A puce sluice drips and blobs sans cérémonie, producing a thrill-packed finish as it slowly congeals.

Larger pieces are fully on vapours. A thrilling picture! A dazzling series in abandoned jade and tachisme purée. A luminous emerald slathered before an indifferent public. Dilute browns (known as ‘cinnamons’ in England at the time this goes to press) are a magnificent metaphor for the poète maudit. The striations of the black surfaces, portals into an imaginary 19th-century city, recall the beautiful megalomania of one who frequently wrote to newspapers in support of her besieged friend. Technique mixte. A pillow in relief, painted in the Aquitaine region. All the curves of the model’s body whipped smooth until they turn to garlands.

Merely for diversion, Robertson goes about in odd shapes; in which she acts her part so naturally, that even those who are in on the secret can perceive nothing by which she might be discovered. For that, I’m grateful.

——–

Dr. Mulholland reviewed for Puce Timesfor three years from 1996, during which period he exclusively covered painting in the Zlín Region of Moravia. Although his website www.neilmulholland.co.uk still includes his biography, which can be found through a search engine, it no longer prominently features him.

No One Driving (Redux) at Performing Art History

performing research: Art history not for publicationA conference organised by the Performing Art History Special Interest Group
Friday 6 May 201112.00 -18.15, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

The Courtauld Institute of Art

Speaker(s): Thomas Ardill (Tate), Emma Cheatle (University College London), Diana Cheng (McGill University, School of Architecture), James Day (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Martin Hammer (University of Edinburgh), Jim Harris (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Jack Hartnell (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Becky Hunter (University of York), Ayla Lepine (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Maria Loh (University College London), Carol Mavor (University of Manchester), Nicola Moorby (Tate), Neil Mulholland (Edinburgh College of Art), Michelle Rumney (Independent artist), Katie Scott (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission, but please book in advance, preferably by 12 noon Wednesday 4 May

Organised by: Jack Hartnell with Dr Katie Scott (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Whilst the methodologies of art history have been subjected to radical critique and constant renewal since the 1970s, our conceptualisation of research aims and our expression of research outcomes have remained remarkably limited, static, and conventional.

In an attempt to address this imbalance, Performing Research will look beyond traditional methods of delivering art history, reaffirming the live lecture as a unique moment to communicate the wide-ranging subjects of the discipline in ways that redirect attention from theory in the abstract to the media and practices of art history.

Through the innovative use of image, text, sound, film, performance, and digital technologies, the papers will begin to redraw the parameters of art history through the media in which it is embedded. Showcasing radical and self-conscious experimentation with instruments of presentation that are already extending the discipline, the conference allows dynamic new relationships to emerge between the ways of presenting information and that information itself.

http://www.courtauld.ac.uk/researchforum/events/2010/summer/may6_PerformingArtHistory.shtml