Tag Archives: OER (Open Educational Resources)

“Der Fachidiot”: The paratechnic in the monotechnic

The Porous University – A critical exploration of openness, space and place in Higher Education | 8th and 9th May, An Lòchran, Inverness Campus

Prof Neil Mulholland
“Der Fachidiot”: The Paratechnic in the Monotechnic
(slide cast of provocation paper):

Paratechnic Principals … paraphrasing: ‘5 Principals’ in Corneli & Dandoff, (2011) Synergising individual organisational learning, Wikiversity

1. Diverse methods, diverse communities of practice
2. Externally-facing ’University of Dissensus’ [Readings: 1997]
3. Immediation, 1:1, live
4. Fluid, adaptive co-learning
5. Cooperative and collegiate

The Porous University Symposium – Programme

See ‘Additional info’ for details of sessions which can be viewed online – this includes sessions to be broadcast live via Twitter, and also a parallel session which will run as a webinar on Day 2.

The hashtag for the event is #porousuni

twitter.com/ShiftWorkESW

Shift/Work: Groundcourse | Roy Ascott

original

 

The Groundcourse is a two year foundation led by Roy Ascott at Ealing (1961-64), Ipswich School of Art (1964-67) and currently at Beijing DeTao Masters Academy in Shanghai.

Groundcourse is a seminal educational experiment that is a key influence on Shift/Work. Prof Ascott will discuss Groundcourse before running a short exercise from it. This is a unique opportunity to experience the legandary Groundcourse at first hand.

Schedule:

1. Discussion of full Groundcourse programme, the theory behind it, and plenty examples of student outputs, both way back in Ealing/Ipswich and currently at De Tao.

Then comes the practice:

2. Each individual student will design and construct a machine that can calibrate changes in one’s individual environment and in one’s behaviour, producing for each user a severely limited repertoire of actions.

3. Organisms are identified, each consisting of five “calibrated” students , recognising their mutual dependancy in enabling the organism’s ability to produce  thought and action.

4. Each organism then to design and build an environmentally-situated  performative game.

5. Presentation: enactment of each organism’s game.

6. Organisms discuss their critical reflection of the process.

Professor Roy Ascott, Ars Electronica Golden Nica award winner, works with cybernetics and telematics on cybernetic art, focusing on the impact of digital and telecommunications networks on consciousness. He is President of the Planetary Collegium, and DeTao Master of Technoetic Arts at the Beijing DeTao Masters Academy in Shanghai. He is the founding editor of the research journal Technoetic Arts, an honorary editor of Leonardo Journal, and author of such the books as Telematic Embrace: Visionary Theories of Art, Technology and Consciousness.

Prof Ascott’s full biography can be reviewed here:

https://www.plymouth.ac.uk/staff/roy-ascott and here

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roy_Ascott

This Must be the Place

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 09.43.04Lightning Talk for Gearing Up for Transitions Conference, 2016

This Must be the Place, slides by Neil Mulholland

GUp Bring and Brag – This Must be the Place, A4 synopsis

Building and Installing Dividing Walls, a manual by Tobias Sternberg

Summary:

MFA students (School of Art) programme their own orientation week as a ‘paragogy’ project. They visit art organisations and, crucially, build their own studio spaces. They quickly establish socio-economic networks that serve them well in their careers as artists, critics and curators, generating an adaptive, geopolitical resilience.

This Must be the Place was concerned with the vital educational role of ‘place-making’, with how contemporary art students develop resources for their practice through the processes of orientation and socialisation. The orientation project was innovative in bringing together art students with non-academic partners for the purpose of introducing all of us to postgraduate education. It allowed MFA students to transition into platforms that suited their practices and so develop a generative context for work from the first week of the programme.

By collectively constructing their studio spaces MFAs gained a invaluable practical lesson in how to establish a studio with limited resources and find a practical solution to the ‘fit’ of the studios. This relates to the perennial problem of ‘allocating’ studio space, something nominally done by staff rather than students. The allocation of spaces is normally conducted before staff have had a chance to ascertain our radically different requirements as artists. RELAY proposed that MFA2s should first collaborate with new students to design and build the common studio spaces in Week 1 as a key component of the orientation project. Collectively designing the the studio space also ensured that all students got exactly the space they required. Part of this aspect of the project involved the construction of the Green Room with common, shared tools and resources and a means of ensuring that the social bonds cemented in the first week remain common, shared tools and resources and a means of ensuring that the social bonds cemented in the first week remain intact.

ABOUT Gearing Up for Transitions Conference, 2016:

The 3rd Annual University of Edinburgh ‘Gearing Up’ event took place on Thursday 5th March 2015 at the John McIntyre Conference Centre, Pollock Halls. To reflect the current QAA (Quality Assurance Agency) Scotland Enhancement Theme of Student Transitions, the event had a broader focus than in previous years and in recognition of this was called ‘Gearing up for Transitions’. It was jointly organised by the Student Induction Team and Academic Services.

The 150 attendees included current students, University of Edinburgh and EUSA staff as well as external colleagues from Higher Education Institutions in Scotland and two staff from Lund University, Sweden.

The day included:

  • a student panel talking about their experience of transitions;
  • Keynote address ‘What Works? Facilitating an effective transition into and through higher education” by Professor Liz Thomas, Liz Thomas Associates;
  • student Art Exhibition ‘It’s a Jungle’ by the University of Edinburgh’s student-run Graphic Design agency “Jungle Studio” dealing with the fear and anticipation before leaving home, school or university;
  • posters and bring and brag stalls;
  • 18 break-out sessions featuring a wide variety of current practice looking at all aspects of transitions during the student journey.

Shift/Work Decisions, Decisions

Decisions, Decisions

This workshop will help you to comprehend how your decisions impact upon your peers (and vice versa). Working in a small group, you will collectively engage in a series of simple creative tasks. These tasks have been designed by a group of artists specifically to heighten your awareness of play and reciprocity in the learning process. You will not be assisted by an ‘instructor’. To complete each task, you will have to be imaginative and resourceful, working closely together and learn from each other. The workshop will engage performative forms of ritual interaction and ecstatic mutuality normally found in gaming, for the purposes of learning how we learn.This workshop is predicated on a ludic theory of ‘decisions’ as reciprocal and enmeshed game-rules governing how actants interact. Playing the game leads to the rules being revised and updated, offering fresh game-theoretic insights. This autotelism relates to our perception of Shift/Work as an iterative process, a set of workshops that can be continually re-performed like a musical score.

This Shift/Workshop is restricted to 12 participants to ensure that each group is small enough to form a playful bond (preventing ‘committee’ decision-making) but large enough to require negotiation and consensus building.

This Shift/Workshop will be based in two studios at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop edinburghsculpture.org

Anyone can take part. No prior knowledge or preparation is required.

Keywords: Decision-making, Paragogy, Workshopping, PAR (Participatory action-research), OER (Open Educational Resources).

Register via Eventbrite

Contact Dan Brown: 0131 551 4490

WHEN
Friday, 19 February 2016 from 09:30 to 16:30 (GMT) – Add to Calendar
WHERE
Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop – 21 Hawthornvale. 19th Feb 2016 (09:30-16:30). Edinburgh EH6 4JT GB – View Map

Shift/Work Unlearning: Participatory Workshops for Contemporary Art Practice

The 4th International Visual Methods Conference, organized by the University of Brighton will take place from 16th September to the 18th September 2015 at the University of Brighton in Brighton, United Kingdom. The conference will cover areas like International Visual Methods conference will be an outstanding conference which will primarily focus on interpretation of visual methods. As we see, a wide array of visual methods used in participatory visual research including ‘Photo voice’, photo-elicitation’, ‘graphic-elicitation’, ‘mind mapping’, ‘concept mapping’ and all forms of ‘Arts-based research methods’. International Visual Methods conference will be organized to focus on all these aspects. The participants will be highly benefitted by the track sessions of this conference. They will be able to know about all the aspects of the concerned industry. It will be attended by the participants with great enthusiasm. 

http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/whats-on/sallis-benney-events/theatre-2015/september/4th-international-visual-methods-conference-2015

9:00-10:30 Thursday 17th September 2015 Session 4: Critical Perspectives on Visual Methodologies – M2 Brighton University,  Eastbourne, England BN20

Shift/Work Unlearning: Participatory Workshops for Contemporary Art Practice

Key themes:

  • Arts based visual research methods
  • Participatory visual methods

Key words:

  • Paragogy
  • Unlearning
  • Workshopping
  • PAR (Participatory action-research)
  • OER (Open Educational Resources)

Paper Abstract:

Shift/Work examines and reconfigures comprehensive workshop-based approaches to artistic production that are theoretically informed, practical and participatory. Shift/Work aims to establish a collective ontology for practice, creating process-led paragogy, critically reflecting upon the learning processes involved, and disseminating research on a share-and-share-alike basis. Key to this is an open engagement with practice (work) as a means of both generating and transferring new knowledge (shift). This experiential knowledge facilitates new practices and open educational resources for artists and art educators to adapt and implement.

In 2014, Shift/Work commissioned an artist (Leeds United www.leeds-united.org.uk) and designer (Crille Lampa www.crillelampa.se) to facilitate a three-day workshop at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop. Shift/Work Unlearning (28-30th May 2014) acted upon current discourses and practices that engage with the values of unlearning, deschooling, improvisation and amateurism.

Working in two groups, the participants, a mixture of artists, educators, curators and arts administrators, spent a day designing an unlearning process for their peers to experience on the final day. The workshop was subsequently evaluated by all involved and re-calibrated to run at the Malmö Art Academy, Sweden (12-14th September 2014).

We will analyse the two iterations of Shift/Work Unlearning as examples of how to design, evaluate and develop an iterative action-based approach to artistic learning that is at once theoretical and practical. We will draw upon relevant literature, discourses, practices and models of unlearning that enable and inspire artistic researchers to implement their own workshops.

Shift/Work Unlearning : Malmö Art Academy

In 2014, Shift/Work commissioned an artist (Leeds United www.leeds-united.org.uk) and designer (Crille Lampa www.crillelampa.se) to facilitate a three-day workshop at Edinburgh Sculpture Workshop. Shift/Work Unlearning (28-30th May 2014) acted upon current discourses and practices that engage with the values of unlearning, deschooling, improvisation and amateurism.

Working in two groups, the participants spent a day designing an unlearning process for their peers to experience on the final day.

The workshop was subsequently re-calibrated to run at the Malmö Art Academy, Sweden (12-14th September 2014).